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    Posts by Clean-Coat

    Murray Hill Pressure Washing | Clean-Coat Portland, OR

    When is the best time to treat moss?

    What time of year is best to treat or remove moss?

    Many people wonder what is the best time of year to address moss. Fall is a perfect time for moss removal and treatment. Most surfaces can be pressure washed as a means of moss removal which addresses most of the organic growth. It is also a good time to chemically treat the microscopic spores which begin to bloom in the fall. If you live in an area where your run-off water does not impact surrounding water sheds, a host of different chemicals including potassium salts, Zinc Sulfite, Zinc Chloride and various bleach based concentrates can be used to mitigate growth. In many cases people are concerned for the health of their families, their pets, their plants and their planet. In that instance, the only other alternative to chemical applications is to use physical agitation (like a deck brash) or cleaning with a heated-water pressure washing system at about 180-degrees. Clean-Coat offers a host of solutions for your toughest moss infestations.

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    Clean-Coat Residential Pressure Washing & Specialty Coating Services | Clean-Coat Portland, OR

    How to Seal your Pool Deck

    How to seal your Pool Deck

     

    Now that it’s pool season in the northwest, we receive several calls from clients inquiring about cleaning, sealing and coating their concrete pool decks. Many people ask us, what’s the best type of sealer for their stamped concrete and exposed aggregate surfaces. Depending on the environment we’re working in, we recommend either water based acrylic sealers or a Xylene based acrylic sealers. The water based sealer is a low VOC (or green product) and provides a good clear protective film that should be applied every other year. The Xylene based acrylic sealers are also a clear top-coat, but also penetrate deeper into the cement binder and usually last about three years before maintenance coats are required. Cost is about the same for both products and both are compatible with an anti-slip additive, which provides better wet-surface traction between bare feet and pool decks.

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    Elastomeric Joing Sealing and Coating | Clean-Coat Portland, Oregon

    How to keep your pool deck looking new

     

    Now that it’s pool season in the northwest, we receive several calls from clients inquiring about cleaning, sealing and coating their concrete pool decks. Many people ask us, what’s the best type of sealer for their stamped concrete and exposed aggregate surfaces. Depending on the environment we’re working in, we recommend either water based acrylic sealers or a Xylene based acrylic sealers. The water based sealer is a low VOC (or green product) and provides a good clear protective film that should be applied every other year. The Xylene based acrylic sealers are also a clear top-coat, but also penetrate deeper into the cement binder and usually last about three years before maintenance coats are required. Cost is about the same for both products and both are compatible with an anti-slip additive, which provides better wet-surface traction between bare feet and pool decks.

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    Clean-Coat Concrete Sealing & Pressure Washing Services | Clean-Coat Portland, OR

    Elastomeric Joint Sealant for Pool Decks

    Many of our clients with pool decks are part of an HOA, or are members of a community pool or recreation center. In most cases, these are the clients who have the most use at their pools, thus their concrete joints and surfaces require more frequent maintenance. Between all concrete slabs around pools, there is a void, which is called and expansion joint. That joint should be sealed with a 2-part, polysulfide based, elastomeric joint seal at all times. Pool chemicals including chlorine and bromine are notorious for deteriorating or braking-down most seals. If left unchecked, the seal eventually fails, allowing water to pass through the seal and under the concrete slab. This flow of water can erode the underlying soil thus causing additional stress cracks on the concrete slab. Most of our clients with pools recognize that sealing the expansion joins is much more cost effective that doing repair work to the concrete. Call today to have a Clean-Coat professional examine your pool deck and expansion joint surfaces.

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    Clean-Coat Concrete Sealing & Pressure Washing Services | Clean-Coat Portland, OR

    Re-Dying Decorative Stamped Concrete

    We receive many questions regarding changing the color of stamped and stained concrete. While re-staining with a darker dye-color is possible, changing from a dark stain color to a lighter color is another story. The new die process does not cover and hide previous die-colors. The die is merely a pigment added to water, denatured alcohol or acetone and is semi-transparent when applied. The die is a concentrate that is diluted and suspended in the various fluids and in spray applied. The fluid will carry the die down into the pours of the exposed cement and into the multitude of tiny/lighter damaged areas and low spots in the stamp-texture. Some of the die settles and dries on high spots also, so this will actually darken the existing color!

    *** It should also be noted that the clear sealer that is applied after the staining process, has no pigment, yet it will accentuate how dark the underlying die and cement looks. It gives cement almost a wet look, just like fresh rain on a dry driveway or sidewalk would make the cement darker, although there is no pigment in rain-water either.

    If our goal is to restore the stain on areas that have been damaged by rain, sun, hot tire pick-up and previous pressure washing, we need to use the same die-color in order to yield the best possibility of a uniform/completed die job. It is possible to minimize how much darker the finished color will be by pre-die the larger deteriorated stain-areas, then dilute the die to about 50% during the full surface application.

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